FLUOROSCOPY

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WHAT IS FLUOROSCOPY

Fluoroscopy is the use of an x-ray system that allows the radiologist to view x-ray images on a computer monitor over time. Many types of fluoroscopic exams use different types of contrast agent that allow various organs to be watched as they function. Examples of these procedures include: Barium Meal, Barium Enema, Intravenous Pyelogram and HSG(Hysterosalpingraply)

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Fluoroscopy is generally painless. Depending on the type of fluoroscopic test you undergo, in general you will be asked to lie or stand between the X-ray machine and table after putting on a gown. You may be repositioned frequently to enable the radiologist or technologist to capture different views.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

PREPARATION & PRECAUTIONS

How to prepare for your Adult Itravenous Pyelogram or I.V.P. exam

Please notify our office about any allergies you have to foods or medications, as well as any recent illnesses or other medical conditions. If you are diabetic make sure your doctor is aware of your condition and the medications you take. If you have any allergies to Iodine, shell fish or had previous reaction to intravenous contrast material, you will need to be pre-medicated before the examination. You may continue taking any medications prescribed by your physician, however, if you take a diuretic (water pill), omit it on the day of the examination. EXECEPTION: Do not take Glucophage. DO NOT EAT OR DRINK ANYTHING 4 hours before the examination.

How to prepare for your Barium enema-lower GI tract exam

A lower Gastrointestinal (GI) tract or barium enema radiography is an X-ray evaluation of the large intestine, also known as the colon. X-rays are used to capture an image of an organ while it is functioning. Though still X-ray images can be useful in examining the colon and rectum, dynamic fluoroscopy is often the most effective way to view abnormal or blocked movement of waste through the body’s lower GI tract. A contrast material is needed to provide exquisite detail of the inside of the colon. Liquid barium and air is introduced into the colon through a rectal tube. The barium coats the inside of the rectum, colon and a part of the lower small intestines, and produces a sharp, well-defined image.

IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT YOUR COLON BE THOROUGHLY CLEANSED FOR THIS EXAMINATION. EVEN A SMALL AMOUNT OF RETAINED STOOL MAY HIDE ABNORMALITES. IN ADDITION, IF YOUR BOWEL IS COMPLETELY EMPTY, THE BARIUM ENEMA WILL BE LESS UNCOMFORTABLE FOR YOU.

You will need to purchase laxatives form the pharmacy and follow the instructions given for your appointment. Be sure to drink plenty of “clear liquids” 12 hours before the exam.

Precautions:

1. If you are diabetic and require insulin, please consult your doctor before starting the preparation.
2. If you have an inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Crohn’s disease, regional enteritis, or ulcerative colitis, you may want to discuss this preparation with your physician.
3. If you are on any medications, you should continue to take them while on the “clear liquid diet.”

How to prepare for your Upper GI series and small bowel or small intestine series exam

An upper GI series is a series of X-rays of the esophagus, stomach, and small intestines. A small bowel or small intestine series is a series of X-rays of the part of the digestive tract that extends from the stomach to the large intestine. While you drink liquid barium, the radiologist will observe the flow in your esophagus, stomach, and upper small bowel.

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the morning of the exam. – Do not chew gum or smoke after midnight, as these activities can cause stomach secretions, which may degrade the quality of the images.

How to prepare for your HSG

HSG (hysterosalpingraply) is a special x-ray procedure to look at the uterus and fallopian tubes. Your doctor may recommend this test if you are having fertility problems.

The HSG will show if you have blocked tubes or an abnormally shaped uterus.

During the procedure, a contrast media will be introduced via a tube placed in the cervix. Contrast media help to outline anatomy and shows up any structural abnormalities. The contrast media will flow from your cervix through your uterus and fallopian tubes. The radiologist will take pictures and determine if there are any abnormalities. This procedure usually takes about 10-15 minutes.

Your appointment must be made during 5 to 10 days after the start of your menstrual period to ensure you are not pregnant.

There is no need to fast for this procedure.

Take an over the counter painkiller, such as Advil or Panadol, 30 minutes before the start of the test. This may be necessary because contrast sometimes causes a burning or cramping sensation. Also, bring along a sanitary napkin, as light bleeding may occur after the procedure.

Please inform the technologist of any allergies or recent uterine/vaginal infections. Please follow the instructions given at the scheduling of your appointment.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

WHEN WILL I GET MY RESULTS?

Generally, your results will be ready within one business day.

Your results will be ready in 3-5 hrs for all services. In some cases, the patient can get the report in 3-5 hrs. Physicians authorized to use our PACS (Picture Archive and Communication System) will be able to view patient images and reports through a secured network as soon as the report is written. This will allow physicians to expedite patient care.

WHAT IS A CT-SCAN

Computed Tomography(CT) uses special x-ray equipment to obtain information from different angles around the body. Computers are then used to process the information and create cross-sectional images that appear as “slices” of the body and organsCT is fast, patient friendly and has the unique ability to image a combination of soft tissue, bone, and blood vessels.

Elite’s 64-Slice or Multi-Slice CT Scanner provides incredibly clear images by allowing our technicians and radiologists to acquire thinner slices and 3-D images, at the lowest dose. This detailed view of a patient’s anatomy leads to faster diagnosis and treatment planning for physicians and their patients. Additionally, greater anatomical coverage in a very short time means shorter breath holds, a key factor for older or medically compromised individuals. (The 64-Slice is also useful for determining one’s risk of coronary disease with 64-Slice CT Angiography).

WHAT TO EXPECT

During the exam, you will lie on a motorized table that will move you into round opening of the scanner. You may hear humming, buzzing or clicking sounds as the CT scanner moves to reposition you for additional images. CT scans are painless. Some exams may require oral contrast consumption or an injection of contrast material.

What if I need a contrast injection?

CT contrast is an organically bound iodine material that is used to make some abnormalities easier to see. Be sure to tell your technologist if you have had a reaction to contrast in the past or if you are particularly sensitive to medications. In addition, you must inform the Technologist of any kidney disease, as the CT contrast is excreted from the body by your kidneys.

If recent blood tests have been done, please take the results with you.

IV contrast has some brief, normal side effects. During the injection, you may feel slight burning at the injection site and a warm flush over your body. You may also get a metallic taste in your mouth and nausea. Some persons also feel the urge to urinate.

Relax, these sensations last about 3 minutes.

The contrast is excreted quickly through your urine.

For the rest of the day, drink lots of water to help you body get rid of the contrast. The contrast will brighten the image and help the radiologist to make a diagnosis.

If you have recent blood test results, please make them available.

CT scans can take between 5-30 minutes.

You must remain still during the scan.

You will be able to communicate with your technologist during your scan.

After completing your scan, you can return to your normal diet.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant or diabetic.

PREPARATION & PRECAUTIONS

Depending on the type of scan you require, you may be asked to avoid normal eating or drinking for a period of time. You should continue medications prescribed by your doctor unless informed otherwise.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant and or diabetic.

WHEN WILL I GET MY RESULTS?

Generally, your results will be ready within one business day.

Your results will be ready in 3-5 hrs for all services. In some cases, the patient can get the report in 3-5 hrs. Physicians authorized to use our PACS (Picture Archive and Communication System) will be able to view patient images and reports through a secured network as soon as the report is written. This will allow physicians to expedite patient care.


WHAT IS AN MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical diagnostic machine that uses large magnet and radio frequency to view inside the body. MRI is a painless procedure that allows your doctor to view certain types of tissue and can provide very important information about the brain, spine, joints and internal organs . In addition, it allows your physician to early detect disease or injuries, and start treatment as soon as possible.

How does MRI work?

Your body is composed of atoms. Water or hydrogen atoms make up 95% of the human body. Usually the hydrogen atoms within the body spin at random. When you have an MRI, you are placed in a strong magnetic field that is up to 8,000 times stronger than that of the earth, which causes these atoms to realign and spin all in the same direction in all 3 planes of the body. Energy is released from the body, this energy is then used to obtain detailed images. A computer processes these images to produce detailed pictures of the anatomy.

Can anyone have an MRI?

Because some metals interfere with the function of the MRI equipment, certain patients are not able to have an MRI exam. The following equipment or conditions may create problems with an MRI. Please call with concerns about any of the following metals in your body.

• A pacemaker or pacing wires

• Metal fragments in one or both eyes

• Inner ear implants

• Cerebral aneurysm clips

• Implanted neuro stimulator

• Tens unit

• Orthopaedic Implants

• Medication and Nicotine patches will need to be removed

• Old gunshot wounds

WHAT TO EXPECT

How long does it take?

The exam usually takes between 20 to 60 minutes. If your doctor orders your MRI exam with contrast, the exam may take longer to complete.

What is contrast?

In some cases, your doctor may order your test with contrast. This is a fluid that is injected into a vein (usually in the arm). This helps to make certain details on the exam clearer and is routine for certain MRI exams. Contrast media are substances that help to differentiate and outline body structures clearly, and helps to make certain anatomical details clearer and is routine for certain MRI scans. Contrast used for MRI is very well tolerated by patients. It has very small risk of allergy or adverse side effects. Most patients feel nothing during injection. Please tell the technologist about you allergies or illnesses. The contrast is excreted through your urine. After your exam, drink lots of water to speed this process. If contrast if require, you will be required to sign a consent form. If you have had recent lab(blood) work, please bring a copy of the lab results on the day of your exam.

What will happen during the MRI exam?

You will be asked to lie down on the examination table on your back. The table will slide smoothly into the opening, and you will be positioned either head first or feet first, depending on the type of exam. Once the exam begins, it is important that you are as still as possible. You will hear “knocking” and “banging” noises, and the hum of the machine. This is all normal. The technologist will talk to you during the exam between various scans. You will be given hear plugs to help reduce the noise and protect your ears.

PREPARATION & PRECAUTIONS

What should I wear?

Your technologist will ask you to remove anything metallic, such as dentures, hearing aids, watches, jewellery, hairpins or articles of clothing that may contain metal, such as underwire bras or zippers. These items, along with your purse, wallet, keys, pagers, cell phones or other personal items will be secured in your change room during your exam. You will be asked to change into a gown.

What if I feel anxious or claustrophobic?

One of the first things we recommend to anyone who thinks they might feel anxious or claustrophobic during an exam is an advanced trip to our facility to actually look at the scanner. We often find that once patients see how wide the opening is and how short the scanner is, their anxiety is eliminated. Remember, MRI scanners have changed dramatically over the last 10 years, and are no longer made with such small, restrictive openings, and long “tubes” or “tunnels”.

Our technologists are very skilled at helping you feel relaxed and comfortable during your exam. You may have a family member in the room with you if you desire. If anxious or claustrophobic, you can get medication from your doctor to take before you have your scan.

WHEN WILL I GET MY RESULTS?

Generally, your results will be ready within one business day.

Your results will be ready in 3-5 hrs for all services. In some cases, the patient can get the report in 3-5 hrs. Physicians authorized to use our PACS (Picture Archive and Communication System) will be able to view patient images and reports through a secured network as soon as the report is written.

This will allow physicians to expedite patient care.

WHAT IS AN ULTRASOUND

Ultrasound uses high frequency sound waves to obtain images of the human body.
The sound waves are transmitted, and then received back through a hand-held device called a transducer.
A computer converts this information into images, which the skilled sonographer can observe continuously while moving the transducer over your skin, constantly changing the point of view and adjusting technical factors to demonstrate the anatomy to best advantage.
A unique feature of sonography is that is involves no exposure to x-rays, and the pictures can be seen in real time.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Ultrasound is a painless and safe procedure.

A technologist will assist you onto the examination table.

A water-based transmission gel will be applied to the area of your body that will be examined.

A transducer will be moved slowly over the body part being imaged.

You won’t feel a thing except for the slight pressure and movement of the transducer over the part of the body being imaged.

Please remain still and relaxed during the procedure.

The ultrasound images will appear on a monitor similar to a TV screen and will be recorded either on paper for film for a detailed study.

PREPARATION & PRECAUTIONS

How to prepare for your Ultrasound exam of the abdomen

For morning appointments, do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your procedure. For afternoon appointments, eat a light breakfast, but no food or drinks 8 hours before your procedure.

DO NOT EAT ANY DAIRY PRODUCTS, SODA, BEANS OR CABBAGE 24 HOURS BEFORE YOUR PROCEDURE.

If you have any questions about what to eat, please feel free to contact our office

How to prepare for your Ultrasound exam for pregnancy, kidneys, and bladder

Eat meals – DO NOT FAST! (Except for ultrasound of the kidneys)

Drink 20 ounces of water one hour and 15 minutes prior to the time of your appointment.

DO NOT EMPTY your bladder until your procedure has been completed or you have spoken with a technologist. If for whatever reason, you are unable to maintain a full bladder, please call our office for further instructions. The average time for your procedure is approximately 30 minutes to one hour depending on the kind of examination being performed.

How to prepare for your Ultrasound exam of the pelvis

Eat meals – DO NOT FAST! Drink 32 ounces of clear liquids (no soda) one hour and 15 minutes prior to the time of your exam. (All of the liquid is to be in your system one hour before your appointment so that your bladder will be full.) DO NOT EMPTY your bladder until your study has been completed or you have spoken with a technologist. If, for whatever reason, you are unable to maintain a full bladder, please call our office for further instructions.

The average time for your study to be completed is approximately 30 minutes to one hour depending on the kind of examination being performed.

WHEN WILL I GET MY RESULTS?

Generally, your results will be ready within one business day.

Your results will be ready in 3-5 hrs for all services. In some cases, the patient can get the report in 3-5 hrs. Physicians authorized to use our PACS (Picture Archive and Communication System) will be able to view patient images and reports through a secured network as soon as the report is written.
This will allow physicians to expedite patient care.


WHAT IS AN X-RAY

Digital X-ray involve exposing a body part to a small dose of radiation to produce an image of aninternal organ. An X-ray image is produced when a small amount of radiation passes through thebody and strikes an image sensitive plate placed on the other side of the body. This film is then placed in a developing machine to produce images.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

WHAT TO EXPECT

For your x-ray procedure, you may be asked to remove clothing, jewellery or metallic objects from the area of interest/body part being imaged. If necessary, a gown will be provided for you to change into. The technologist will lead you into the room and place you in the desired position for the x-ray image. Most procedures require two images to be taken.

Additional images may be required should there be questionable findings. Your procedure will take between 10-20 minutes depending on what test is needed.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

PREPARATION & PRECAUTIONS

No special preparation is required for most bone x-rays. You may be asked to change into a gown before your examination and remove jewelry, eyeglasses and any metal objects during the exam.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.

WHEN WILL I GET MY RESULTS?

Generally, your results will be ready within one business day.
Your results will be ready in 3-5 hrs for all services In some cases, the patient can get the report in 3-5 hrs. Physicians authorized to use our PACS (Picture Archive and Communication System) will be able to view patient images and reports through a secured network as soon as the report is written.
This will allow physicians to expedite patient care.

*Always inform the technologist if you are pregnant.